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Looking Back On Scouting Reports For Ravens Players

Posted Feb 24, 2017

As the NFL Scouting Combine approaches, we take a look back to see what pundits said about future Ravens when they were in the pre-draft process. Some were pretty accurate, while others were not so great.


As the NFL Scouting Combine approaches, pundits are getting out their evaluation sheets and preparing to make some tweaks.

It’s certainly not a perfect science, as a look back in history shows.

Here are scouting reports from over the years on players that turned out to be Ravens. Go ahead and judge for yourself how accurate they were:

OLB Terrell Suggs (2003)
(Scout.com)

“Explosive athlete that continually blows up plays behind the line of scrimmage. Quick off the snap with a nice first step, plays low to the ground with leverage displaying force and speed in any direction of the field. Needs to mature physically and add bulk. Seemingly takes wide angles at times to avoid blocks and over pursues the action. Just gets better and better the more he plays. Could be used as an outside linebacker in a 3-4 scheme and may also be considered for the strong side in a 4-3. Then again, a better version of Jason Taylor to this point in his career and potentially a dominant defensive end in the future.”

OLB Elvis Dumervil (2006)
(CBSSports.com)

“Dumervil might not possess ideal size and bulk for the traditional defensive end position, but his ability to stay low in his pads and maintain leverage and balance allow him to consistently defeat bigger blockers. He comes off the snap with good explosion, using his long arm reach effectively to keep blockers from attacking his feet or getting underneath his jersey.”

G Marshal Yanda (2007)
(ESPN)

“Yanda doesn't have overwhelming power or athletic ability but he is a tough drive blocker who never stops working. He also can be a sound pass blocker when lined up inside. He played out of position at right and left tackle as a senior, but he projects as a guard in the NFL. Yanda could eventually emerge as a solid starter at the next level, which is why he warrants consideration late on Day 1.”

S Eric Weddle (2007)
(CBSSports.com)

“Weddle has ‘flown under the radar’ where national media attention is concerned, but many in the scouting industry agree – Eric Weddle is the finest athlete in the college game today. …  Possesses adequate overall muscle tone, big, natural hands and loose hips that allow him to accelerate quickly in the open … Aggressive tackler who is called a coach on the field for his keen knowledge of the complete playbook (both defensive and offensive) and ability to play a variety of positions … Outstanding role model for the younger players, showing good mentoring skills and a great work ethic … Puts in the extra hours in the film and training rooms and is smart enough to sit in on game-planning meetings with the coaching staff … Will see Weddle possibly be a regular visitor to the Pro Bowl.”

QB Joe Flacco (2008)
(NFL.com)

“Flacco is one of the more intriguing quarterback prospects of this draft. While he lacks the big name of some of the other highly-ranked prospects, he possesses the prototypical combination of size and arm strength scouts are looking for. His steady improvement while at Delaware bodes well for his future development in the NFL, but Flacco's ability to handle the greater speed of the NFL is the determining factor of his final draft status.

“Certainly looks the part ... Tall, rangy frame with room to add additional mass ... Prototype arm strength ... Can make all of the NFL throws with ease ... Adequate speed in his set up and delivery ... Solid mechanics ... Possesses an over-the-top delivery and good footwork ... Showed significant improvement in terms of poise and accuracy as a senior ... Consistent accuracy in the short- and medium-range passing, especially toward the sidelines ... Improved accuracy deep ... Learned to read defenses better as a senior ... Made proper check-downs in second year in the Delaware offense rather than relying on his big arm to thread the needle ... Has shown the ability to handle two different offensive schemes in making a successful transition from Pittsburgh to Delaware ... Lacks foot quickness and pure speed to ever be a true scrambling threat, but is a strong runner -- especially as a QB sneak threat -- due to his toughness and size ... Isn't a finished product, but shows the tools worthy of development.”

CB Lardarius Webb (2009)
(NFL.com)

“Tough, aggressive defensive back prospect who will likely flourish in a zone system ... Very willing to support the run and attack quick screens, can secure tackles by wrapping up or effectively cutting ... Able to read the quarterback and attack the ball with good closing and recovery speed … Corner/safety ‘tweener’ due to his lack of size and elite speed ... Barely adequate height and length for a corner ... Stiff and slow in his backpedal ... Slow in his transition from backpedal to attack short routes.”

WR Mike Wallace (2009)
(NFL.com)

“Looks the part. Athletic build with room for additional mass. Rare straight-line speed. Eats up the cushion quickly and can blow by the defender. Smooth acceleration and has a late burst to pull away if being challenged. Can track the ball over his shoulder. Developing into a more reliable route-runner and pass-catcher. Has the foot quickness and balance to be a good route-runner and can sink his hips.”

TE Dennis Pitta (2010)
(NFL.com)

“Plenty big with very good hands and concentration. Possesses rare body control and consistently shields defenders from the ball. Runs precise routes and is very smooth in and out of breaks. Extremely productive in college. Lacks the bulk necessary to be a productive in-line blocker. Operated from a two-point stance and will have to learn to release from the line. Does not have the speed to spread the field at the next level.”

CB Jimmy Smith (2011)
(NFL.com)

“Corners with Smith's size, speed and confidence in press coverage don't grow on trees. He'll likely serve as reserve/nickel early in his career but has the skill set to eventually become a starter. Very effective playing man coverage close to the line of scrimmage where he can use his size and length to disrupt timing patterns. Can recover after initial bump and compete for the football. Isn't as comfortable in off-man or zone but could improve over time. Has the mentality and physical tools to be very productive in run support, just needs some more polish. Smith's tools and upside will likely land him in the second round.”

DT Brandon Williams (2013)
(NFL.com)

“Williams became a three-time All-American as a senior, using a combination of strength and agility not usually seen at the Division II. He doesn't have nearly the same skills as someone like Dontari Poe, but has enough talent to be at least a solid rotational tackle who could stick in the league for a while.”

FB Kyle Juszczyk (2013)
(ESPN.com)

“Juszczyk isn't just a smart player with limited big-play ability, as you might expect from a Harvard prospect. He's a hard-nosed runner who fights for yards after contact and after the catch, and he is an aggressive lead blocker who doesn't back down. He can hold up in pass pro or release when he lines up in the backfield, and he can line up in the slot.”

LB C.J. Mosley (2014)
(NFL.com)

“Smart, instinctive, fast-flowing, every-down linebacker capable of manning any position in a "40" front or steering a defense from the weak side in a "30" front, where he starred for a national championship defense as a junior and carried the Tide as a senior. Has the football temperament, desire and work habits to emerge as a tackling machine in the pros. Has Pro Bowl potential.”

DT Timmy Jernigan (2014)
(NFL.com)

“Slightly undersized, stoutly built, country-strong run stopper with the ability to drop anchor inside an odd front and develop into a solid, 3-4 movement nose tackle. Strength is his calling card despite his relatively modest size.”

RB Terrance West (2014)
(NFL.com)

“Good-sized, compactly built, highly productive, physical workhorse and program-changer who took Towson to new heights while dominating inferior competition. Has the chops to factor prominently in a power-running scheme, showing the ability to slash and cut, run over defenders and contribute as a receiver.”

WR Breshad Perriman (2015)
(NFL.com)

“Rare combination of size, top-end speed and suddenness that can be found in some of the best receivers in the game. Arrow is pointed way up on Perriman and he is one of the most discussed prospects in draft rooms around the league. His drops will drive teams crazy, but his physical traits and ability to hit the big play should warrant early consideration.”

OT Ronnie Stanley (2016)
(NFL.com)

“Three-year starter with the outstanding foot quickness and pass protection talent expected from an early round left tackle prospect. Stanley showed great maturity in acknowledging his weaknesses and returning to school to work on them and improve his game. While Stanley's core power is still a concern, he showed improved strength and run blocking prowess this year and should be ready to come in and start right away for a team looking to protect a high-­end quarterback.”

CB Tavon Young (2016)
(NFL.com)

“Right off the bat, Young's lack of size is going to take him off draft boards for teams. While he's small and doesn't have as much quick­-twitch or high-­end speed to make up for it, he does play with decent ball skills and competes hard against consistently bigger targets. He will have to transition into the slot, but the quickness and separation ability of those NFL receivers could be challenging for Young to match.”

Please Note

The opinions, analysis and/or speculation expressed on BaltimoreRavens.com represent those of individual authors, and unless quoted or clearly labeled as such, do not represent the opinions or policies of the Baltimore Ravens' organization, front office staff, coaches and executives. Authors' views are formulated independently from any inside knowledge and/or conversations with Ravens officials, including the coaches and scouts, unless otherwise noted.

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