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The Caw: The Cornhole Craze Is Back in the Ravens Locker Room

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It seems Monday’s charity cornhole event has rekindled the Ravens’ love of the game.

After being dormant for a few years, punter Sam Koch, kicker Justin Tucker and long snapper Morgan Cox (the Wolfpack) have brought back the official Ravens Cornhole Federation, which was first created in 2011 and carried through the 2012 Super Bowl run.

The Ravens have played cornhole in recent years, but a change in the meetings schedule and other fads, such as ping-pong, free-throw shooting and bubble hockey overtook it in popularity. The last official tweet from @RavensCornhole was in 2012.

“We had played it so hard for those three, four years that we just wanted a break,” Koch said. “The boards are still here and there’s been a little more attention on it recently, so we’re trying to see if we can bring it back.

“Back when we were doing it, it was such great team bonding. You get to interact with young guys and a lot of other people that are just sitting in the locker room and we may not be interacting with.”

This year’s double-elimination tournament features Koch, Tucker, Cox, Joe Flacco, Brandon Williams, Tony Jefferson, Terrell Suggs, Danny Woodhead, Matthew Judon, Marlon Humphrey, Javorius Allen, Bobby Rainey, Ryan Mallett, Josh Woodrum, Lardarius Webb and Carl Davis.

“Sam is the Godfather. Morgan is like a Tony Soprano-type,” Tucker said. “Everybody else falls in line somewhere. The tournament is wide open outside of Sam and Morgan.”

Tucker is currently trying to get more bags from the American Cornhole Organization. He’s in charge of that after he busted a bag open recently after throwing it in anger. Yeah, not much has changed.

For those who do not remember the long, storied history of the Ravens Cornhole Federation (I still have my free T-shirt), here’s a look back in history.

It has featured games with legendary linebacker Ray Lewis, a trash-talking rivalry between Haruki Nakamura and Michael Oher and the dominant play of Koch:

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